Why The New Yorker’s New Font Looks Awfully Familiar

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THE CONDE NAST MAGAZINE INTRODUCES A BRAND NEW FONT THAT TIPS ITS HAT TO ITS STORIED PAST

How do you take an iconic brand like The New Yorker into 2013? A very careful redesign that pays homage to the magazine’s 88-year history. “Looking at the magazine’s historical routes, we saw some design touches in its first issues that we wanted to bring back,” says the New Yorker‘s creative director, Wyatt Mitchell. Namely, its stylish original font.

The iconic  typeface was created in 1925 by the magazine’s first art director, Rea Irvin, who was inspired by an old woodcut typeface from the book Journeys to Baghdad.

Last year, the team hired Delaware designer Ben Kiel to rework and modernize the font now known as “Irvin.” The result: something elegantly retro, yet suddenly new again.

Check out this behind the scenes video about how the whole process unfolded.

 

 

 

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